Grandpa’s TV set and regret

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Television sets are special to the writer’s grandfather Baharon Ali, seen here with granddaughter Haney Falisya, as they remind him of his late wife Rosiah Abdullah.  He cherishes a Toshiba set that he carted home in 2003 for her.  ST Photo:  Ng Sor Luan.

[Source:  The Straits Times, 29 October 2011]

By

Hanis Sofea Abdul Rauff

Hanis Sofea Abdul Rauff, 14, is a Secondary 2 student at Christ Church Secondary.  She wins $300 in shopping vouchers and a JVC Digital Videocam GZ-MS120S.

Many in our family regard the outdated Toshiba TV set stashed in the store-room of my aunt’s Sembawang flat as a piece of junk, but not my maternal grandfather Baharom Ali, 76.

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It is special, reminding him of his abiding love for his late wife Rosiah Abdullah.

Theirs was a love marriage, celebrated in 1960, when she was 16 and he 24.

Grandma was a Chinese convert whose foster family were neighbours.  That was how they met and fell in love.

After they wed, Grandma, while doing her chores, would follow the broadcasts of popular Malay and Chinese soaps on the radio in the 1960s.  She wished she could watch the shows on television but Grandpa was a brick maker of modest means who had to provide for his wife and seven children.

He had to work even harder in the 1970s as the family upgraded from a rented room to a one-room flat that he bought in Kallang Bahru.

Grandma fell critically ill with kidney and heart problems in the late 1990s and Grandpa now had the added burden of his wife’s expensive medical treatment.

He decided to take on an extra job as a construction workder to make ends meet.  Eventually, he bought a tiny TV but always wanted a better set for her.

Then came the fateful day in 2003 when his boss at the construction site received a call informing him that Grandma was dying.

As Grandpa was rushing home, he spotted a decent, discarded Toshiba TV set near their flat.  Without a second thought, he carried it home, hoping to show his wife that he had fulfilled her wish, but it was too late.  She was 59.

Until today, Grandpa, who is now a school cleaner, blames himself for not being at his wife’s deathbed.

I am proud of him though.  To me, the TV set, which no longer works, shows the extent he would go for a loved one.  And I am sure Grandma knows how deeply he loves her still.

Memories of Bygone Days – Sale of the Century

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“It’s been there ever since you can remember  – the Chinese roof, the stone lions in front of the red door.  But in September 1982, that Orchard Road landmark was demolished.  All that’s left of C. K. Tang would be our memories” – Yvonne Quah.

[Source:  The Straits Times, 24 September 1982].

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Like any business, Tang’s has had its fair share of ups and downs over the last 50 years. Read more about C.K. Tang here .   Please watch the video with courtesy of the ‘Mustsharenews’ group on Facebook here .

Chiam Sum Guan, linen and bedding supervisor, can’t quite forget the sense of loss when Grandma Tang died.

He also remembers how Tang expanded from a mere 10 departments to 30 in one year and there were floods and bomb scares but infinitely more memorable were the shoplifters.

One shoplifter locked himself into the staff toilet, hoping to spend the night wrapping up his stolen goods.

He had hoped to surreptitiously slip out in the early morning rush for the restrooms.

However, he didn’t have long to wait before the security men caught up with him.

The visits of royalty and stars were always a high point.

Mr Tang Wee Sung, General Manager, remembers being awe-struck and terrified being presented to Prince Norodum Sihanouk and Princess Monique.

He was then a youngster in shorts clutching a Brownie camera.

Although he was dumb-founded he did manage to click his Brownie camera.

Recently, the same schoolboy took the Prince and Princess round the new store, self-assured and at ease.

The Christmas rush will always remain a significant memory for Alice Wee, Information Supervisor.

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She used to have to package as many as 500 to 600 parcels a day.

And once, she had to choose $3,000 worth of Christmas presents for a customer who hadn’t any time to do his Christmas shopping.

Others have childhood memories of the stationery department as a haven for school children.

There were pencil boxes galore, coloured pencils in boxes of 42 colours, records, cards and hordes of other bargains.

We all must have our own peculiar memories over the years.

As an anniversary celebration, Tangs had a host of in-store activities to take us down memory lane (from 24 September, 1982 to 16 October, 1982).

Tangs recaptured the dying trades and vanishing crafts, a cooking demonstration.

Paper profile cutter, Mr Tan Yee Hong cut profiles for customers at minimal charge of $5.

Mr C.K. Tseng’s Red Lion Collection was on show.  Other exhibitions include Nonya ware, old clocks, Victorian items and the fashion of the 30s.

There was ikebana and bonsai demonstrations in addition to copper tooling and glass blowing.

Two cobblers were on hand to demonstrate making ladies’ shoes and the opportunity to order custom-made shoes.

And to really lure us back to the good old days, there would be a “five-stones” demonstration.

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‘God Tree’ in Toa Payoh, Singapore

 

Then and Now ….. The ‘God Tree’ shrine at Toa Payoh Central
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According to The Straits Times, 20 September 2013, the ‘god tree’ survived  and the site remained as a place of worship for devotees.

Beside Block 177, Toa Payoh Central, the towering tree trunk stood firm although the trees around the place felled by storm.

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Between Blocks 178 and 179, Toa Payoh Central, a majestic banyan tree stands in its compound with an altar for the devotees to worship.

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For four decades, it bore witness to the prayers and dreams of devotees who worshipped at a Buddhist shrine at its foot.

The residents rebuild the shrine to be protected by the gods to bless the devotees.  Regarded by believers as a “shen shu” or ‘god tree’ in Mandarin, the tree was said to be more than a century old.  The mighty tree pre-dated Toa Payoh new town itself, on which work began in 1965.

Residents continued to linger at the tree, some out of sheer habit and others to trade tales and memories.

They shared stories of how the tree stood the test of time, weathering the occasional thunderstorm and dodging the developer’s axe.

Retiree Foo Ah Cheng, 78, remembered seeing bulldozers try in vain to fell the tree as the new town was being built.

He said monks even offered prayers calling for the tree to give way.

“They wanted to get rid of it, but it wouldn’t go,” he said in Mandarin.

From its precarious past grew longevity.  Over the past decades, a steady stream of devotees have offered prayers for goodwill each time they passed the shrine.  Some believe it was responsible for 4-D lottery windfalls.

Even the tree’s leafy crown seemed to extend goodwill to residents.

Mr Foo recalled how the tree became so lush that its leaves kept the shrine and devotees dry when it rained.

He said the original caretaker was a monk who brought the statue of Goddess of Mercy Guan Yin from China and had a habit of sleeping under the tree.

When the monk died in 1975, his son Chen Zhou Rong took over and stayed on-site come rain or shine – greeting visitors who arrived at all hours to seek solace from the tree and the gods lining the shine’s altar.

As well as attracting devotees, the shrine also used to elicit “oohs” and “ahhs” from the curious onlookers and tourists from afar.

“The trees was very, very beautiful and many would take photos of it,” said retiree Lu Siew Bao, 60, who lives in the block next door.

On the tree, pink flowers in full bloom fanned out across its long, hanging branches.

Heritage enthusiast Jerome Lim, who grew up in Toa Payoh, said the shrine was a significant part of the estate’s heritage.

The 48-year-old told The Straits Times it served as “a link to the past when much of the area was occupied by farms and Chinese kampungs.”

[Note:  Jerome Lim is a veteran heritage blogger at “The Long and Winding Road”.  People, places, events, words and images that have left an impression on him along the long and winding road …    Please check out the related blog about Toa Payoh here .]

For many, it was a meeting point, and praying there had become very much a part of their everyday routine.

Ms Agnes Pek, a 40-year-old sales assistant who works at a beauty shop a stone’s throw from the site, said she used to pray for safety and a good day before starting work every morning.

Saving trees that are rooted in an estate’s past

In ‘Heartland Happenings’ of The Straits Times, 17 July 2001, Neo Hui Min wrote “Even as new buildings crop up, efforts are being made to preserve old trees that have become part of a town.”

Ask any Toa Payoh resident about an old tree in the neighbourhood and you will probably be directed to the one next to Block 177, at Toa Payoh Town Central.

There, between two rows of Housing Board shophouses, a banyan tree, with its tangle of branches and aerial roots, stands tall, looking much older than the building around it.

Estimated to be at least 50 years old, it has a 3 m wide, 2 m tall shrine nestled among its branches and roots.

No one knows whether the shrine was there before the tree or vice versa, but some of the tree’s branches clasp a rather old-looking wall which forms the back part of the shrine.

Six of eight residents that The Straits Times spoke to believe that the tree is part of the town and must not be destroyed.  Madam Tan Boey Lin, 53, a housewife, drops by occasionally to offer incense at the shrine.  “This is a spiritual tree.  People say it can’t be cut down, otherwise bad things will come to our town.”

But university student Adrian Lee, 23, said:  “Sometimes, these trees become ‘mystified” for no reason.   I guess it depends on what the tree looks like.  Somehow, banyan trees just have a mysterious look.”

Urban legend has it that in the early 1960s, when the land here had to be cleared away for the development of Toa Payoh, an engineer who tried to remove the tree was crushed to death under his own vehicle.

After praying to the tree for several years, residents set up a shrine under it in 1969.  It houses the four-faced Buddha and the Goddess of Mercy, and attracts many devotees during the first and 15th days of each lunar month.

A sacred banyan, smack in the heart of Toa Payoh

By Bill Campbell

[ Source:  The Straits Times, 11 July 1971]

It must go, the authorities ruled.

Nothing, it seemed, could save the old banyan tree – long held sacred by Toa Payoh squatter families – from being uprooted.

But the bulldozer driver cajoled into the job “collapsed” at the wheel and yet another attempt to remove the tree was abandoned.

Now over two years later the unflinching banyan tree still stands undisturbed –  right in the heart of the Toa Payoh town centre development.

No longer is the tree – nor the dilipidated Chinese base -under threat of removal.

Because, as if to justify the faith devotees have in its powers, it so happens it fits ideally into the modern town centre layout.

“It is a happy coincidence that things have turned out this way,” says Mr Liu Thai Ker, Head of the Housing and Development Board’s design and research unit.

But devotees who continue to move over the construction site to pray for good fortune before their deity doubtless read more than coincidence into it.

Before earthwork began at the Toa Payoh new town site most of the country was undulating farm land.

Squatter families who once lived there have since dispersed leaving nothing to indicate how the tree first came to be regarded as sacrosanct.

Nothing is on record where the board is concerned.  It appears that there was once a more substantial shrine at the site, for parts of a wall in temple style – almost unnoticeable in the entanglement of roots – still exist.

Right from the outset, building workers are said to have kept a respectful distance from the tree and for as long as possible it was left untouched.

Not surprisingly as the new town grew space and orders went out to remove the tree workers balked at the task.

“It was just that the tree was considered sacred and no one was willing to take any risk by cutting it down,” says Mr Liu.

Even then, board planners disavow that the tree basically influenced the town centre design, though it was always in mind.

“The design was dictated by other factors far more important than the tree,” Mr Liu says.

It is primarily the location of the tree, including the line of the main pedestrian mall that is said to have saved it.

The board has a special plan to improve the general setting of the tree, including the paths around it.

Because of its ever-spreading “strangling” roots, maintenance promises to be “pretty tricky”, as Mr Liu puts it.

In particular, board engineers are concerned that the roots do not damage the foundation of the four-storey shophouses taking shape on three sides of the tree mound.

Upon the shrine’s  altar table, along with other paraphernalia, is a collection box and money collected has obviously gone to providing a few wooden benches and a fairly concrete pit for burning joss-paper.

Fresh stalks of orchids and food offering are among evidence that the shrine continues to be well frequented despite the construction activity all around.

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Hearsay has it that devotees pray there for family happiness …… success in business …… for “numbers” or simply good luck.

No matter what the background of the tree, it is adding some welcome lore to the story of the new town itself.

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20190624_143811.jpgA devotee praying earnestly

Long story short …

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For over 40 years, a banyan tree which is said to be guarded by a spirit was a landmark at Toa Payoh Central.  It even had a small shrine at its foot for devotes to offer prayers.

In September, 2013, a violent form caused the tree beside Block 177, Toa Payoh Central, to fall.

For worshippers drawn to the shrine’s Goddess of Mercy and other deities, the collapse seemed to mark the end of an era.

However, the Singapore Toa Payoh Central Merchants’ Association felt there was a need to preserve whatever remained of the tree and its shrine, known as Ci Ern Ge.

They took over the management of the shrine’s daily operations and spent over $100,000 to spruce it up.

The vice-president of the association, Mr Lim Kok Siong, said in Mandarin:  “NParks (National Parks Board) wasn’t keen to keep the tree initially, but we managed to convince them eventually.”

Now, as a result of the storm, the tree is only about three storeys high, about half of what it used to be.  It has also lost its leafy crown.

NEW ITEMS

Ci Ern Ge [  慈恩阁  ], however, boasts new flooring, lights, fans, fences and handrails after it re-opened in mid-June.

There is even a ramp providing easier access to the shrine for the disabled.

Retail assistant ET Teoh started praying at the shrine about five years ago.

The 40-year-old told The New Paper in Mandarin:  “The new shrine is better.  It is much cleaner and there is better ventilation.  You also won’t feel that it’s crowded, even when there are a lot of people.”

Ms Teoh works at a retail shop in the area and she would pray at the shrine whenever she walks past it.

She added:  “I hope that the shrine will always be there as it is convenient for me (to pray there). ”

Legend also has it that a bulldozer was overturned when its driver tried to ram the tree down.

This led to people to believe that the tree was guarded by the Na Tuk Kong spirit.  So a shrine was built.

In addition to having this spirit, which is said to reside in trees and other natural formations, the shrine also has a Tua Pek Kong and Goddess of Mercy.

The shrine’s owner, who wanted to be known as Madam Low, has been helping to spruce up the place whenever she is free.  She performs tasks such as wiping the chairs and altars clean and clearing the joss sticks.

Madam Low told TNP in Mandarin:  “Many people come here to pray for safety.  I also see many young people coming here to confide in Guan Yin (Goddess of Mercy).

Since it re-opened, more than 100 devotees have been visiting Ci Ern Ge daily and the Singapore Toa Payoh Central Merchants’ Association has pledged to use the donations for charity.

The president of the association, Mr Yeo Hiang Meng, said:  “I hope that it can become the centre of attraction for Toa Payoh and that the residents here can get to know its history.”

20190625_154553.jpgThe HDB Hub in the background of the “God Tree”.

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Toa Payoh merchants to restore tree shrine

[Source:  Straits Times, 2 May 2014]

By Melody Zaccheus

A group of Toa Payoh merchants have banded together to restore a damaged Buddhist shrine at the foot of a tree that is believed to be divine.

The shrine, which houses statues of the Goddess of Mercy and the four faced Buddha, will get a new coat of paint, brighter lights and new flooring.

Funds for the renovation effort, estimated to cost about $70,000, came from members of the association and devotees.

The money will also go towards installing fencing and steel cables to stabilise the remnants of the tree, which toppled after a storm last September.

Mr Yeo Hiang Meng, chairman of the Toa Payoh Central Merchants’ Association, said they decided to save the tree shrine located in Toa Payoh Central because of its significance to the community.

“We want to do our part for residents and devotee to ensure that they will have a place to pray at,” said Mr Yeo.

Called a shen shu, or divine tree, in Chinese, the tree predates the estate and has, for decades, been a gathering point for residents, devotees and 4D punters hoping for a lucky number.  Hundreds stop by daily to pray before they go about their activities in the busy town centre.

….. Mr Yeo said the association will hire a full-time caretaker to oversee the day-to-day management of the site when it is ready.

It also engaged the help of an arborist, who suggested the stabilising measures for the Banyan tree, HDB said the tree will have to be checked regularly for safety reasons.  Moving forward, HDB will continue to work closely with the licensee to ensure that the site is well-maintained and safe,” said its spokesman.

The association plans to erect a heritage marker at the site to share with visitors and tourists its history and how the tree had stood tall in the face of bad weather and the developer’s axe.

For instance, residents believe the Government split the current development of shophouses into two to accommodate the tree.

Mr Yeo hopes HDB will consider awarding them a long-term licence to use the site.  “It has a rich heritage and strong links to the community.  We hope the site will be here for a long time to come.”

Devotee Foo Hock Seng, 79, who visits the shrine once a month, said he appreciates the efforts of the association.  He said:  “It used to be quite rundown.  I look forward to visiting the upgraded shrine.”

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The school at Outram Road, Singapore

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The former Outram Prison located beside Outram School (above) was demolished and replaced by the HDB flats and shops at Outram Park (below).

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Little Red Dot walks you through some of the oldest schools in Singapore.

By Eisen Teo in The Straits Times, 13 March 2002.

One of the oldest … government schools in Singapore.

Founded: 1906 (106 years old).

Founded as:  A primary school that took in local pupils but used English as a medium of teaching, which was the exception for schools at that time.  Most schools taught in mother tongues like the Chinese dialects, Malay or Tamil.

The government, which was controlled by the British then, wanted to encourage the learning of English.

The school, named Outram Road School because it was located in Outram Road, was officially opened by the Governor of Singapore, Sir John Anderson.  It served as a feeder school for Raffles Institution, one of the top schools in Singapore at that time.

1939: The school was renamed Outram School.

Blast from the past:  In June 1939, Outram School headmaster R W Watson-Hyatt installed two traffic lights in the school – one of the front corridor and another over the main staircase, to regulate human traffic.  He decided to do so to educate pupils on heading traffic lights, which was introduced on Singaporean roads only a few years before.

Blast from the past:  In 1941, as the threat of a Japanese invasion of Singapore grew, the Education Ministry ordered Outram School to move its records to the nearby Pasir Panjang English School for safekeeping.

Unfortunately, while Outram School survived subsequent bombings, the Pasir Panjang school was destroyed – along with all of Outram School’s past record.

1954:  Outram School was converted to a secondary school.

1958:  Girls were admitted for the first time.

1961:  Outram School was renamed Outram Secondary.

1968:  The school moved to its present premises at York Hill, off Chin Swee Road.

1977:  The school opened a swimming pool – only the third school in Singapore to do so – and formed a Life Saving Society to teach students life-saving skills.

Famous Alumni

Former president Wee Kim Wee, former Deputy Prime Minister Wong Kan Seng and actor and host Gurmit Singh.

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Outram Secondary School at York Hill

[Source:  The Straits Times, 20 May 1970].

Outram Secondary School was officially opened by Mr Hon Sui Sen. MP for Havelock on Friday, 22 May 1970.

The school, originally in Outram Road, was demolished in 1968 two years ago to make way for urban renewal and development of the Outram MRT station.

Now sited in York Hill, it is a multi-purpose secondary school offering academic education with  a commercial bias and technical education.

The new building has a centralised workshop for technical workshop practice, four science laboratories, facilities for home economics, art and crafts rooms, a shorthand and typewriting laboratory and a library.

Outram Secondary moves back home [Source:  The Straits Times, 29 August 1999].

By Leslie Koh

One of S’pore’s first English schools, it celebrated the opening of its new premises on 28 August 1999 night with 600 guests.

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From Home Affairs Minister Wong Kan Seng to actor-comedian Gurmit Singh, Outram Secondary School has groomed many well-known names in Singapore.

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Last night, many of them went back to school – to celebrate the opening of the school’s new complex.

About 600 guests, including Mr Wong, Mr Koh Cher Siang, the commissioner of Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore, and Brigadier-General Patrick Choy, Singapore’s ambassador to Myanmar, had dinner in the school hall.

The entertainment was, of course, provided by old boy Gurmit Singh.

The school was rebuilt at a cost of $27 million.  It sits atop York Hill off Chin Swee Road, and boasts a 93-year history.

Founded in 1906, the school was one of the first English schools to be built by the colonial government.  Originally set up as a primary school, it used to groom students for Raffles Institution.

The new school complex is made up of six buildings, with some as high as six storeys.

There is also a large open-air amphitheatre, dance studios and s rock-climbing wall.

Its star facility, however, is the 25-m swimming pool, retained from the old complex.  The pool had helped the school build a reputation for excellence in swimming and water-polo in the past.

Outram Secondary is the only government school to have a swimming pool.

The 1,100 students and 60 teaching staff moved into the new premises in June last year, after it was completed.

For four years before that, classes were conducted in a school at Winstedt Road, while the rebuilding was being done.

Principal Chan Poh Meng said that the school’s strengths lay in its history as a school offering commerce subjects

Students used to graduate not with O-levels, but with a London Chamber of Commerce certificate of commercial education.

That was between 1957 and 1963, after the school had converted from a primary to a secondary school.

While the school no longer issues the LCC certificates, it has maintained its commerce roots.  Today, it has more students taking such subjects at O-levels than most other schools.

These subjects include commerce studies, office admimistration and accounting.

Outram Secondary was also ranked among the top 20 value-added schools for normal stream this year.

Said the principal:  “Outram has a history comparable to that of other top schools.  We want to maintain this tradition of an all-rounded education.

Memorable photos to remember

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Can you recognise the buildings behind the school field in the background?

Outram Secondary rebuilt school

[Source:  The Straits Times, 14 May 1999]

By Sandra Davie

BEFORE

The old building was built in the 1960s.  It had 21 classrooms and a sports hall.  In 1977, the school advisory committee raised funds to build a 25-m swimming pool.

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NOW

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The new six-storey bulding, at about 20,000 sq m, is double the size of the old one.  It has 36 classrooms, each of which is about 20 sq m larger than the old ones.

There are also four computer rooms with 40 computers each, a larger staff room, an amphitheatre, a multi-purpose hall, an indoor sports hall and several special rooms, including a dance studio, sound-proof music room and a fitness room.

School has become a more lively and interesting place for Outram Secondary students since their big move into a new six-storey building.

Jevon Liew, 15, for one, looks forward to stepping inside his school at York Hill, off Chin Swee Road, every morning.

He enjoys his classroom lessons more now because they have become “less chalk and talk” and more activity-based.

He said:  “Before that, when we were in an old building at Newton, my lessons just had the teacher standing in front of blackboard and talking.

“Now, lessons are more fun.  My teachers use computers, we go out of the class for project work and we get to play-act our literature texts at the amphitheatre.”

The 93-year-old school was rebuilt at it original site at a cost of $27 million.

When its staff and 1,100 students moved into the new, larger premises last July, Outram started life as a single-session school.  Lessons are held in the morning, and enrichment activities, remedial classes and ECA take place in the afternoon.

But in the four years of waiting for their new building to be ready, staff and students were using the old Monk’s Hill Secondary School building at Winstedt Road in Newton.

Outram was one of 106 secondary schools rebuilt since 1988, to convert them into single-session school.

Outram Secondary principal Chan Poh Meng said that even before the move, his 70 teachers were edging towards more activity-centred teaching to infuse creative and thinking skills in their students.  But they were constrained by the facilities.

“The biggest obstacle was the shortage of classrooms.  We had to function as a double-session school.  That meant that a whole lot of enrichment and remedial classes could not take place because we just didn’t have any spare classrooms,” he said.

Despite the Education Ministry’s push towards IT-based teaching and learning, his teachers had found it difficult to incorporate the use of IT in their lessons, he said.

“The classrooms were not wired up.  To teach computer application, we had to convert two small classrooms into two small labs with 20 computers each and the teachers had to move from one classroom to the other.”

Outside of the classroom, the school could only provide for run-of-the-mill extra-curricular and enrichment activities, he added.

“We didn’t have the dance studio, the soundproof music room, amphitheatre and multi-purpose sports hall that we have now.”

Moving into a new building has made all the difference.  The teachers say the state-of-the-art facilities have allowed them to try out interesting new approaches to teaching.

Mr Derek Tan, an English Language teacher who uses IT in every other lesson, said:  “This is a new generation of young people.  They have been brought up on computers.  So when you use computers, it is half the battle won, because they associate it with fun and games.  You see the students sit up and listen.

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Each classroom has been wired to allow for up to 11 computers.  Soon, notebook PCs will be available in classrooms for more computer-based lessons.

The head of English, Mr K. Selvakkrishnan, said that the bigger classrooms and the availability of more interaction spaces have also led to more group and project work.

“The bigger classroom space allow teachers to change the arrangement of tables and chairs for group work.  On top of that, there are many quiet, conducive spaces outside of the classroom that can be used.”

Mr Lee Khim Song, 29, head of science, said the six science labs and computers meant that teachers can get students to do more lab experiments on computers to demonstrate concepts.  Science has therefore become more “real and interesting” to the students, he added.

The school’s head of physical education and ECA, Mr Tan Tee Suan, who has been with Outram since 1970, said teachers could now offer more and interesting activities outside the classroom.

Rain or shine, the students play badminton, basketball, netball and football in the new multi-purpose sports hall.  Next to come is rock-climbing – once their $86,000 rockwall is ready.

“The new kind of teaching and learning methods demand new facilities – and it is good to have such facilities,” said Mr Tan.

Outram students agree totally.  Lee Yu Wei, 16, a secondary 4 student heading the students’ council, said:  “Using computers and doing project work and drama has made lessons even more interesting.  ECA and afternoon hour activities have also become more fun.”

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Another archived photo (below) of the former Outram Secondary School at Outram Road, courtesy of the National Archives of Singapore and other unnamed contributors.

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Long Long Time Ago

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Revisiting the past with Jack Neo’s new film “Long Long Time Ago”.

After making ‘Homerun’ in 2003, popular home-grown director Jack Neo had always wanted to make another movie exploring kampong family life – and he finally get to do so with the release of ‘Long Long Time Ago’ in 2015.

“I have all these fond memories of my own childhood growing up in the kampong – you know, catching earthworms in middy ponds and rearing pigs at home – and I wanted to make a movie that can really showcase those good old days, he tells Life! in Mandarin following the press conference held at Marina Bay Sands on 10 December, 2014 to announce his latest project.  (Source:  The Straits Times, 11 December 2014).

“After I made Homerun, I’ve wanted to explore kampong life a lot deepter, to tell a more complete kampong story.  And what better time to take this movie in 2015, when Singapore celebrates its 50th birthday?  The movie will evoke a lot of good memories for many Singaporeans.”

Homerun, his remake of Iranian flick Children Of Heaven (1997), was about a pair of siblings in 1965 Singapore.

Long Long Time Ago, a $6-million project to be released in two parts, is said to be a heartwarming story about a single-parent family and will take them from Singapore’s birth in 1965 all the way to the present day.

The first part, due out at the end of next year, will focus on the kampong days, while the second part, scheduled for release in 2016 during Chinese New Year, will have the family move out of the kampong and into HDB flats.

The official trailer on YouTube here .

Kampung boy Jack gets nostalgic

By Wendy Teo in New Paper, 15 November 2002

At a certain spot in a Chai Chee carpark, you might see Jack Neo standing deep in thought.  No, the acclaimed director is not seeking inspiration for his new movie.

Instead, the 42-year-old is reminiscing over his childhood memories; the spot is where his old kampong house used to be.

Jack told reporters at the prayer ceremony for his new movie, Home Run, how much he missed the kampong life at old Kampung Chai Chee.

He had spent 16 years of his life there.

Jack said in dismay: “My old kampong is now an expressway! And where my house used to be, there is now a carpark.  There used to be so much space.  It’s quite sad to see it gone now.”

Incidentally, Home Run – inspired by the Iranian film, Children Of Heaven – is based in a kampong in ’60s Singapore.

It’s about a small boy and his younger sister who have to share one pair of shoes between them.

The son of a fishmonger, Jack said that even though is family wasn’t rich, his parents always made sure that the children’s needs were met.

“We didn’t know whether we were considered poor or rich, because there was nobody for us to compare with.  Everyone else in the kampong was just like us.  And my parents could afford our schoolbags, uniforms and stationery.

“The only time we felt different was when our neighbours had toys, or “bak kua” (barbecued pork) to eat, and we didn’t.  Some of them would even boast about going out for a seafood dinner, but we never had the chance to do so.”

According to Jack, going for a seafood dinner was considered a big treat then as it meant going to a proper restaurant and “the way they cook the seafood is different from how you cook it at home”.

But while Jack never had to go without shoes, he had to plead for a long time before getting his pair of basketball shoes, the ankle-cut canvas ones hat were highly popular back then.

“There was no Nike or Reebok.  I just wanted the Panda brand of high-cut shoes, but my father refused.  In his time, my father had to go to school barefoot, and he told me to be grateful that I even had shoes.”

But, eventually, Jack’s mother gave in and bought him the much-coveted China-made shoes.

As the eldest in the family (he has two younger brothers), Jack had to help out in the family by taking care of the pigs and chickens.

But, as a treat, his grandmother would take him and his brothers to the movies, a makeshift open-air affair.

Jack’s eyes shone as he talked about watching the black and white films – like Ten Brothers and Monkey God – at the cheap ticket price of 20 cents.

He also remembered how, after watching a Bruce Lee movie once, he broke his brother’s arm during a play-fighting session.

“I was in Secondary 1 then.  We were fooling around and pretending to fight with each other.  My brother was executing a Bruce Lee move he learnt from the movie when I blocked him and broke his arm.

“My parents didn’t know what to do with me.  And they didn’t scold me, which made me feel even more guilty!

“Hearing my brother yell out in pain at night made it even worse.”

These days, the kampong kid has made good.

From imitating Bruce Lee’s moves, Jack is now a lauded local director who has been praised by Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong himself.

In fact, Jack was given the International Management Action Award by Spring Singapore at the Shangri-La Hotel.

The award was for the contributions he and his successful production company, J Team Production, have made to the media industry.

Jack now lives in a semi-detached house in the east, together with his wife and three children.

But he will have the chance to relive his childhood memories while working on his fifth and latest movie.

He left for Malaysia yesterday for location shooting of Home Run.

He said: “It’s not possible to find a kampong here in Singapore.

“Everything’s either built-up or has been set aside for preservation.  But I managed to find a kampong in Malaysia, just like what Singapore had in the ’60s, right down to the attap trees.”

As the school holiday has begun, Jack said he would take his wife and children along to Malaysia.

“I want to show my children what kampong life is like.

“In fact, that’s the point of my movie, I want kids to know how tough life can be, and also how import a pair of shoes can be to some people.

“These days, kids are too fortunate.  They don’t know what hardship is.”

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Childhood memories of PM Lee Hsien Loong

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Every child of every generation in Singapore have fond memories of tasting ice-cream to enjoy and remember for a lifetime.

With the courtesy of NewspaperSG, I would like to excerpt the relevant topics for an interesting article from The Straits Times on 28 May, 2001.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong told Political Correspondent Irene Ng what anchors him emotionally to this place.

A favourite haunt of teens and couples in the 1960s, the Magnolia Snack Bar, once where Centrepoint now stands, closed down in the 1980s.  This building held special memories for BG Lee as this was where his grandmother would take him and his two younger siblings when their parents were abroad, attending to national matters.

Sometimes, when Deputy Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong drives past Centrepoint, a series of sepia-coloured images flashes through his mind.

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His late grandmother walking close to him as a young boy.  Going to the Magnolia Snack Bar.  Buying ice cream.  Special times.

It was a real treat then.  After all, that was the snack bar in town.

About 35 years on, Brigadier-General (NS) Lee, now 49, breaks into a smile at the memory.  “In those days, it was something special.”

BG Lee mentions this spot when asked which buildings hold special memories for him, at a relaxed point towards the end of a 45-minute exclusive interview with The Straits Times.

…. How to anchor Singaporeans here and inspire a genuine sense of belonging to Singapore as their home.

One way to approach that question is by winding path of collective memory, signposted by events and places.

It emerges that, like many Singaporeans, BG Lee cherishes memories about certain buildings.

Other than the Magnolia Snack Bar, there were the schools he attended – Nanyang Primary School and Catholic High School.

Both institutions have since shed their original shells for new ones.

BG Lee muses:  “I don’t know what will happen to the old buildings, but I hope some will remain, because you remember the times you were there, the things which you did, the classrooms you were in, the times when you had a tremendous go with a band in the auditorium and brought the house down.”

In the school band, he played the euphonium and later, the clarinet.  He was also the drum major, and editor of the school magazine.  “Your memories are with the old buildings.  Hopefully, some of the spirit has transferred over to the new ones,” he says.

But with all these images is an overlay of ideas and convictions, formed as he grew up, about what makes this small country special.

“I think it’s a combination of experience and circumstances and a certain sense that you can see that things can be done better and you believe you can contribute.

“It’s a small place, you make a difference if you are there.  You can add something extra.  Nobody’s indispensable, so you can’t say ‘only I can do it’.

“But it is a job worth doing and I think it’s something a lot of us felt we’d be happy to dedicate ourselves to”.

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Mrs Lee Kuan Yew with her sons Hsien Loong (left) and Hsien Yang (right) at Nanyang Primary School. Lee Hsien Loong received a prize for ‘model pupil’ and top boy of the primary section. Photo on 13 November, 1963 with courtesy of the National Archives of Singapore. (Source: National Archives of Singapore).

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National Day Parade 1969 Third Rehearsal at the Padang – Combined schools band of Catholic High School and Raffles Institution, led by drum major Lee Hsien Loong, marching down St Andrew’s Road on 27/07/1969.

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Memories of Magnolia Snack Bar in Orchard Road, Singapore

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The first ice cream manufacturer, Magnolia, sets up shop in Singapore in 1923.

Magnolia Snack Bar, a place close to the hearts of many older Singaporean and a favorite place for ice cream for over 40 years.  It was a hip place to hang out in the 60s and 70s, and a favorite haunt for young couples.

As one former patron said, it was the place to “take a date who mattered”, and at $5 each for a full meal, eating at the café was a special treat.

“If I bought a girl there, it meant that she was really special,” he said.

Goodbye to an ‘old friend’

In New Nation published on 24 July 1979 headline “Saying a tearless goodbye to an ‘old friend'”.

It looks like a tearless goodbye for Magnolia Snack Bar at Orchard Road when the bulldozer trundles in to pave the way for a new seven-storey building to rise in its place.

Despite the imminent end of this more than 40-year-old building, staff morale seemed quite high when a New Nation team visited it on 23 July, 1979.

The date for the demolition of the bar, a favourite rendezvous of teenagers in the sixties and still a top draw with schoolchildren and families, has not yet been set.

Mrs Agnes Leong, the “youngest” on the staff because of her nine years’ of service, said she felt “a little sad” about having to leave.

But she is confident of being transferred to the supermarket, with her 19 colleagues.

Although Magnolia Snack Bar and the building is gone, the taste and the memories of Magnolia ice cream is still available everywhere in Singapore, including the first ice cream hawker stall in 1984 at lot 123 in Telok Ayer market hawker centre, smack in the middle of the central business district (photo below).

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Now called Magnolia’s, the outlet (picture above) has reopened at its original location at Centrepoint in 2002.

Magnolia, the most established name in the local ice cream scene, is rising to the challenge.

The prices of a few of the imported brands now costs their customers a bomb plus an arm and a leg to have an ice cream.

It’s ridiculous to think that we started with ice cream even children could afford.  It’s a question of affordability.  Mr Heng Teng Kwang, senior business (dairy) of Cold Storage Manufacturing: “We have watched with great interest Haagen Dazs, Gelato and Baskin-Robbins, and found one interest common element – their selling price.”

“Then there is the challenge of meeting the changing lifestyle of Singaporeans, who now eat out more often.”

As ice cream is often bought on impulse, Magnolia’s solution is to make it available where the crowd is, while keeping the price low, Mr Heng said.

During my childhood days in Bukit Ho Swee, I could only afford the unbranded “potong” ice cream at 5 cents each and enjoy them just as much.

The first time of my visit to Magnolia Snack Bar at Orchard Road as a special treat here .

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In 1950, dozens of licensed and unlicensed “ice cream factories” spring up as small-time operators try to get their bite of the market which is growing with the baby boom.

Ice cream is still sold by itinerant hawkers, some of whom also make the ice cream themselves.  The hawkers travel on foot, often with pail in hand.  There was even one Indian ice cream hawker who used a bullock cart in the early 1900s.

In time, they graduate to the push cart, bicycle, motorcycle with side car and the three-wheeler, selling ice cream between wafers, in cones or sandwiched between bread slices, and the ever-popular popsicles and lollies.

Please share the fond childhood memories of the ice cream man posted on this blog .

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The archived photos shared on this blog with the courtesy of NewspaperSG and the National Archives of Singapore.

Develop young kids with talent

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In 2016, I posted the blog “A Teochew Opera Child Star is Born” here .

Recently, I watched this video to share on YouTube to enjoy 張楚怡小朋友 – BTV北京電視台文藝頻道《我家有明星》.

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More photos of 張楚怡小朋友 from People’s Republic of China

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《見多識廣》魯豫有約:小鬼當家 (上集)
張楚怡、張峻豪及謝豪─三位擁有表演天賦的小朋友,他們熱衷於舞台表演,深得觀眾喜愛。今集除了送上他們精彩的演出外,還會通過任務小考驗讓大家看看台下的他們;另外還有專家解答父母們在教育孩子上遇到的疑問。

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姓名 :  张楚怡   性   别:女     生   日:06月10日  双子座   职   业:学生